OPCMH

ORGANIZATION
for
PRESERVATION
of
CANADIAN
MILITARY
HERITAGE



OPCMH
 

HISTORY OF WORK POINT BARRACKS

by Jack Bates

PART 7 — 1957 to 1963


1957

4 LAA Battery was relocated to Picton, Ontario, and the 1st Artillery Maintenance Unit was disbanded.

Building 1075 in Work Point, the brick barracks built for the Royal Garrison Artillery in 1902, and “Recognized” by FHBRO, has a bronze plaque embedded in the outside south wall next to the entrance. It is inscribed:

CAVE BLOCK

CONSTRUCTED BY
ROYAL ENGINEERS – 1902

RENOVATED BY
ROYAL CANADIAN ENGINEERS – 1957

The Patrician
March 1958

Patricia’s Return To Work Point Barracks

After a period of 18 years absence, during which the battalion has seen service in two wars, and a two year tour of duty in NATO, the Patricia’s returned to Work Point Barracks.

The advance party, headed by Major C.V. Lilley, MC, CD, arrived on 4 November to find the nucleus of an advance party already on the spot. This group was under command of Capt. A.V. Stopps, who had gathered considerable information about the area, which proved invaluable to the advance party.

The two main problems to be solved were, first, to fit the battalion into Work Point Barracks, which were not designed to accommodate a battalion. The second was to take over Barrack Stores from HQ Esquimalt Garrison, and then to move all the stores and equipment received from the 2 QOR of C from Gordon Head to Work Point.

Foresight on the part of Lt. Col. J.C. Cave, CD, Commandant of Esquimalt Garrison, in having renovation of the old barrack block begun prior to the arrival of the advance party, avoided a difficult situation in barrack room space. Lt. Col. Cave recalled to us the days when he was quartered in the same building while serving with B Company before WW II. History has a habit or repeating itself, as B Company is once again quartered in this barracks block.

The other problems of accommodation were soon solved. The trick now is to marry off enough of the new soldiers coming into the battalion so that we won’t run short of bed space in the barracks. Weapons and equipment are now becoming available, thanks to a big job well done by the QM Staff.

Seventy five of our married personnel have been able to get PMQ’s. Very little difficulty is being experienced in obtaining suitable private accommodation for the others. The people of the island have given us a warm welcome home, and are not taking advantage of the sudden demand for housing. Accommodation comparable to PMQ’s can be had for between Ninety and One Hundred dollars a month.

The two main training areas, Mary Hill and Albert Head, are fifteen and ten miles respectively from camp, just a good march distance. Work Point boasts and excellent 30 yard range. To augment this there are ranges at Heal’s and Nanaimo. Approval has been given for the construction of a parade square large enough to Troop on, and a new sports field which will include a 440 yard cinder track.

The use of the gym and swimming pool at Naden once a week for each company, and recreational training such as golf and fishing the year round, should make this a paradise indeed.

Shortly after the arrival of the advance party the officers were invited to a cocktail party by Major (Paddy) Crofton at his home, where they were able to visit with Brig. Colquhoun before his departure for Europe.


1958

The Patrician
March 1958

Sergeant’s Mess

After a great deal of bartering, buying and horse trading, the large blue sign “RCA SGT’S & WO’s Mess” sign was quietly removed from its anchorage on 1st Dec 1957 and the Patricia’s officially took over at Work Point Barracks.

1PPCLI
May 31, 1958

The Ceremony of
TROOPING THE COLOUR
on the occasion of the visit of
Brigadier A. Hamilton Gault
DSO, ED, CD

Honorary Colonel and Founder of the Regiment

Work Point Barracks, Esquimalt, B.C.

July 15, 1958

“The Glass House”, a local name for the Work Point Detention Barracks, was closed on this date. It was called No. 15 Service Detention Barracks at the time.

The Patrician
October 1958

OFFICER’S MESS

Swimming in the mess pool became popular in June 1958. The pool was cleaned out with the help of some “volunteers” from the RCN who were enjoying army hospitality in our “crowbar hotel” and was soon ready for use after the long period of neglect.

TROOPING

The ceremony of “Trooping the Colour” carried out by the First Battalion at Work Point Barracks on 31 May is believed to have been the first such ceremony ever carried out by a regular force unit in this part of Canada. Together with its accompanying social functions, the ceremony was a great success, and was enjoyed by all who attended.

The weather on the morning of 31 May threatened rain, but fortunately the sky cleared a little as the day wore on. Some 3500 invited guests and about 1500 additional members of the general public turned out to watch the Battalion Troop its Colour.

ENGLISH RUGBY

Some old Patricia’s may remember the Rugger Team of 1934 – 39 which became BC Champions. When we heard of this we decided to give it a try ourselves. Undaunted by the fact that only three persons in the battalion had played before, we began practicing twice a week.

After a few instructional periods, games were played with following results:

Lost to Victoria College twice, 15 – 6 and 16 – 10
Lost to Oak Bay (BC second division champions) 15 – 3
Defeated HMCS Venture 6 – 3
Tied Royal Roads 3 -3

VICTORIA

On 10 January ’58 the former 4 LAA Bty Cadet Corps of Victoria was taken into the PPCLI family. 2Lt PM Stevens acted as liaison between the battalion and the cadet corps, later relinquishing the job to Lt JD Snowball. Lt Col de Faye officially welcomed the corps into the PPCLI family and presented each cadet with a new PPCLI cap badge.

Training during the winter and spring was conducted on Tuesdays and Fridays at the Macaulay drill hall. In addition to this the corps participated in 15 small-bore rifle competitions throughout the winter season. There were 5 first class shots in DCRA, Sgt Walder having a total of 295 points, and Cpl Barclay 294. Silver spoons were presented each week to the best shot and each winner earned 3 points for the following week’s shot. This encouraged the poorer shots to increase their scores in order to win. The band under Cdt Sgt Cuzner and Cdt LCpl Bennallack progressed very well.

The following promotions were awarded:

Cdt Cpl Turner R
Cdt Cpl Barnen W
Cdt LCpl de Faye T
Cdt LCpl Clayton J

The annual inspection was held on 30 April with 51 cadets on parade. This was attended by numerous parents and other spectators/ Lt Col de Faye was the inspecting officer, and British Columbia Area was represented by Capt RH Graham and Lt D Walton.

15 cadets enjoyed summer training at Vernon.


1959

Daily Colonist
March 1, 1959

FIRST EXPLORERS

... Estevan Point again made history when, on June 20, 1942, a Japanese submarine surfaced about half a mile off shore and shelled the light house. Approximately 25 shells were fired, and except for a few buildings hit by shell fragments, no damage was caused either to the lighthouse or radio station. The shells were 5.9 calibre and weighed 80 pounds; a dud found on the beach was weighed. Several overshot the target and landed in the vicinity of the Hesquiat Indian village, five miles directly behind the light house. They scared the Indians but did no damage.

1PPCLI
July 17th, 1959

FIRST BATTALION PRINCESS PATRICIA’S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY
AND
THE KING’S OWN CALGARY REGIMENT

The Ceremony of
PRESENTATION OF COLOURS
by
Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

Beacon Hill Park
Victoria, British Columbia
Friday, July 17th, 1959

Times
November 25, 1959

OLD COLORS NEVER DIE

Ceremony rich in tradition saw old colors of 1st Battalion, PPCLI, deposited for safe keeping at St. Paul’s Church, Esquimalt, today. Color party, seen entering church, laid up old colors after receiving new ones from Queen Elizabeth last summer.

Old Colors Never Die

Times
November 25, 1959 pg 23

“SAFEKEEPING”

Old PPCLI Colours Rest At The Altar

In a ceremony both colourful and solemn the old colours of the 1st battalion, PPCLI, were placed in permanent safekeeping at St. Paul’s Naval and Garrison church, Esquimalt this morning. The colours had been in the battalion’s possession since 1934, when they were presented by the earl of Bessborough, then Governor General of Canada. They were replaced this summer when Queen Elizabeth presented new colours at Beacon Hill Park.

Regimental colours, by ancient tradition and by a regulation which came into effect in 1898, are deposited in churches for safekeeping when not in use, or as a permanent record when they have been retired from active use. The colour guard today was escorted by an honour guard with fixed bayonets from Work Point, marching along Head street to Esquimalt road, then to the church. The honour guard was preceeded by the scarlet-jacketed, white-helmeted battalion band.

THREE TIMES

The ceremony at the church began when Capt. Robert Frost, adjutant, pounded three times on the closed doors with the hilt of his sword. The door was opened by rev. J.S. Roberts, rector of St. Paul’s, and Capt. Frost said: “Reverend sir, I have been commanded by Lt. Col. J.C. Allan, commanding officer of the 1st Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, to inform the authorities of this church that he has repaired here today with the old colours of the battalion and desires admission to prefer a request that they be deposited herein.”

PRESENT ARMS

The rector replied that “every facility will be afforded him in executing his most laudable purpose.” The honour guard then carried out the command “to the old colours, Present Arms,” and the colour party carried the colours into the church. Following divine service, the colours were turned over to the warden by Col. Allan. The rector received the colours from the warden, and draped them on the altar, where they were saluted by Col. Allan and the officers of the colour party.


1960

The Patrician
April 1960

Laying Up of Old Colours

For the First Battalion, 1959 will be remembered as the year Her Majesty the Queen presented New Colours to the Battalion. A less spectacular but equally moving ceremony took place on 25 November, when the Old Colours were laid up in t. Paul’s (Anglican) Church of Esquimalt.

These Colours were presented to the Regiment on 14 April 1934 by the Earl Of Bessborough, Governor General of Canada, at a parade in Minto Street Armouries in Winnipeg. Thousands of Patricia’s served under the Colours in the 25years they were in service. Of these, 14 officers and 203 other ranks gave their lives in action against the enemy in World War II or Korea.

St. Paul’s was chosen for many reasons. The Regiment has an affiliation with the church dating from 1920 when B Company was stationed at Work Point Barracks. There are three plaques in the church commemorating the service of Patricia’s who died while serving in Victoria. In army circles the church is still known and fondly referred to as “The Garrison Church.”

The Battalion was fortunate to have a sunny day on the 25th as it had been particularly wet the previous few days. When the Guards formed up on the square at Work Point, it was discernible that many on parade had served under the colours in Sicily, Italy, North West Europe or Korea. The Guard Commanders were Major WG Milne and Major AGW Harbord-Harbord and the Colour Officers Lt WJ Kitson for the Queen’s Colour and Lt RM MacIntosh for the Regimental Colour. The only serving Patricia to be on parade both on 14 April 1934 and 25 November 1959 was WO 2 FL Mack.

Led by the Corps of Drums, the Colours were escorted through the streets of Esquimalt to St. Paul’s. At the church the Adjutant, Capt RJ Frost, sought entry for the Colours from Reverend JA Roberts, the Rector. Led by the Commanding Officer, Lt JC Allen, the procession entered the church and Lt Col Allan preferred a request that the Colours be deposited. After an acceptance by the Rector the Guard Commanders received the Colours from the Colour Officers and handed them to the Church Wardens. The Rector then laid the Colours on the altar and Divine Service followed.

While the seating in the church was limited, some 90 Patricia’s and an equal number of dependents and guests formed the congregation. Among the distinguished guests were His Honor the Lieutenant Governor and Mrs Frank Ross, and former Commanding Officers Brig WG Colquhoun and Lt Col JN Edgar. Lt Col VR Schjelderup, Commanding Officer of 2nd Battalion came from Edmonton for the ceremony. Maj PD Crofton and twelve former Patricia’s attended from the Association including S/Sgt G McIllvenny who was on parade in 1934.

After the divine service, informal receptions were held in the Officer’s and Sergeant’s messes.

In the words of the Commanding Officer during the ceremony the Colours were laid up in St. Paul’s “to provide a memorial to the men of all ranks who served under these Colours, and to afford an inspiration for the patriotic service and sacrifice for all who may worship here for all time to come.”

First Battalion PPCLI Colours to St. Paul’s 1959
25 Nov. ’59. Laying up of Old Colours St. Paul’s Church, Esquimalt (Garrison Church).
Maj. WG Milne CD, and Maj. AGW Harbord-Harbord CD, handing over
the Old Colours to the Wardens of the Church.

1PPCLI
May 27, 1960

FIRST BATTALION PRINCESS PATRICIA'S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY

The Ceremony of
TROOPING THE COLOUR
To commemorate

THE BATTLE OF FREZENBERG
May 8, 1915

Reviewing Officer
REAR ADMIRAL HS RAYNOR
DSC CD
Flag Officer Pacific Coast

Work Point Barracks
Esquimalt, B.C.

Friday, May 27, 1960


1 PPCLI - WO’s and Sr. NCO’s 1960

Run cursor over image to stop movement. Panning script compliments of Vic Phillips.


1961

The Patrician
1961 - 1962

Time Gun

In October and November the battalion was involved in one of the typical Victorian “tempest in a tea cup” which had as its centre, the time gun. This gun, from a practice originating many years prior to the war, is fired at 1200 and 2100 hours. The time gun is fired by a member of the Anti tank platoon of the battalion on a signal received from the Gonzales Observatory. Previously the only complaints received were when, due to some interruption in “phone” service or for some other reason, the gun was not fired. Then the Commanding Officer, the Adjutant and the Orderly Officer would be flooded with calls from various retired military gentlemen who wished to know what was wrong with the modern army. In the fall of the year, however, a new batch of ammunition was received for the time gun. This ammunition which was designed to better simulate artillery fire under field conditions contained a larger charge than the type used previously. In a few weeks there were many complaints in the local press and radio regarding the discomfort to local residents caused by the loud report of the new round. All ended well, however, as higher authority acted with commendable speed and took action to reduce the charge in the rounds provided for the time gun and those used for saluting purposes in Victoria.

In the late 1930’s, when B Company PPCLI was the main resident Garrison unit, the telephone cable didn’t go all the way to the time gun shed. Beside the telephone in the Guardhouse there was a buzzer button, when pushed upon getting the timing from the Observatory, a bell would ring in the time gun shed and the duty Sergeant would then pull the lanyard to fire the gun. George Wilkinson knew exactly where the button was.

According to records, the time gun shed, building # 1016, was built in 1906, rebuilt in 1946 and again in 1962, allegedly after a fire destroyed the second one.

See November 2, 1888 for an origin of the Time Gun in Victoria.

Times
May 1961

Neighbourhood Under Gun
Nine O’Clock — And All’s Tense

Every night at 9 o’clock, Ed Parlee of 240 Robert takes a firm grip on the arms of his chair, squeezes his eyes shut – and waits. The house grows still; so still that the clock rings like a blacksmith’s anvil. A sharp angry BOOM jolts the house. The windows rattle – and occasionally crack. The chair containing Mr.Parlee bucks like a wild thing. The cat runs squalling for the basement. As the sound subsides and the plaster sifts down on Mr. Parlee’s neck, he shakes his fist wrathfully in the direction of Work Point Barracks.

The Parlees have just lived through another bombardment from the Army’s evening gun.A slow man to anger, Mr. Parlee has suffered his nightly dose of shell shock without a whimper. But when the windows began to crack and the foundations seemed in danger of sagging, he decided to return the fire and complain.

STATE OF SIEGE — A few calls to the no–man’s land surrounding Mr. Parlee’s embattled dwelling indicated that the entire neighbourhood was living in a state of siege. “Can I hear the 9 o’clock gun ?” roared one. “I can’t hear another thing for 20 minutes afterward! It scares my wife, it terrifies my dog, my daughter is a burned out veteran at three years of age.” “I’ll say I can hear that gun!”

HORRIBLE BANG — “Picture yourself in my living room,” says Ray Hunt, who lives at 311 Maitland and squarely in the line of fire. “We’re all watching TV, see? Nine o’clock rolls around and all of a sudden there’d this horrible bang. “My four kids go right out of their chairs. “My wife drops her cup of tea. “One day, by golly, I’ll fire back!” A neighbourhood observer paints a word picture of the events which lead up to the nightly blast.

HEAVY SILENCE — Just before zero hour, traffic on neighbourhood strees slows to a crawl. Children stop playing, look anxiously in the direction of the barracks and scuttle into the house. Dogs and cats stop doing whatever it is they do and stand, twitching nervously. A heavy silence descends. The look on everyones’s face is a permanent sign of Work Point battle fatigue.

1PPCLI
May 13, 1961

FIRST BATTALION PRINCES PATRICIA’S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY

The Ceremony of
TROOPING THE COLOUR
To commemorate

THE BATTLE OF FREZENBERG
May 8, 1915

Reviewing Officer
MAJOR GENERAL
THE HONOURABLE GEORGE R PEARKES
VC PC CB DSO MC
LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR OF THE PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

WORK POINT BARRACKS, ESQUIMALT, B.C.
SATURDAY, MAY 13, 1961

Run cursor over image to stop movement. Panning script compliments of Vic Phillips.


1962

A Brief History of Work Point Barracks
Esquimalt British Columbia

December, 1962. Prepared by: Sgt. S.J. Fernstrom, Canadian Army Public Relations - Esquimalt Garrison Work Point Barracks Victoria, B.C.

This 12 page booklet covers highlites of Work Point Barracks from 1878 to 1962.

See August 8, 1990.

The Patrician
1962 – 1963

A Brief History of Work Point Barracks
By Major RB Mainprize CD
Garrison Adjutant, HQ Esquimalt Garrison

This 9 page history was an excellent residential version of the history of Work Point Barracks to date, with relevant detail and photographs.

1PPCLI
May 12, 1962

FIRST BATTALION PRINCESS PATRICIA’S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY

THE CEREMONY OF
TROOPING THE COLOUR

To commemorate
THE BATTLE OF FREZENBERG
May 8, 1915

Reviewing Officer
MAJOR-GENERAL JM ROCKINGHAM
CB CBE DSO ED
GENERAL OFFICER COMMANDING WESTERN COMMAND

WORK POINT BARRACKS, ESQUIMALT, B.C.
SATURDAY, MAY 12, 1962






Trooping of the Colour – Work Point Barracks

Times
May 24, 1962

ACCIDENTAL CENTENNIAL project was carried out at the Canadian Army Garrison, Work Point today when workmen installing a new heating system under the administration building un-earthed a human skeleton. Examination of the skull – held by Staff Sergeant Bob Tredwell – indicated that the remains belonged to an Indian of the last century, possibly a Victoria resident of 1862. Skull and skeleton are being turned over to RCMP.

Work Point Skull 1962

The Patrician
1962 - 63

“Century 21”

Seattle World Fair

By Lieutenant AB Paxton

For the period of tenth to fifteenth September 1962, First Patricia’s had the privilege of contributing one officer and forty two other ranks to the Canadian Contingent which put on the “Canadian Tattoo” as part of Canada week at the Seattle World Fair.

The Battalion received word of this coming event early on February. Later in May, the producer, Captain IS Fraser, RHC, visited Victoria and notified the Battalion they were to be responsible for two sequences in the tattoo: the British Period Sentry Mount, circa 1855 and the Modern Sentries. Following Captain Fraser’s visit, the script for the Tattoo along with the British Drill Manual of 1856 were received with interest, however little work could be done in preparation for the Tattoo as Summer Concentration was soon at hand.

During the summer personnel for the British Period Sentry Mount were selected and were measured and fitted for uniforms which were identical to those worn by the British Garrison troops in Canada around 1856.

Early in August the writer, the Guard NCO, CSM (WO 2) Danyleyko and his stand-in Sergeant T Cormier, started working on the drill for the British Sentry Mount. On August 20th the Contingent commenced training under CSM (WO2) Danyleyko and Sergeant Cormier. Demonstrations of the drill brought a few chuckles at first but soon everyone was serious and in no time some twenty new drill movements had been mastered. Those not involved in the British Period Sentry Mount commenced training under Sergeant J Poucher for their part in the Modern Sentries.

Instructions on the rifle drill was made more difficult as until the 28th of August the rifles that were to be used had not arrived and the Contingent had to make do with a varied assortment borrowed from the Militia. On the 28th of August, 21 Brown Bess Muskets arrived. The following day a dress rehearsal attended by some two hundred people, was held and was televised by the C.B.C.

Although a British Drill Manual was at hand it was found that a manual written in French was much easier to understand, once translated. It is interesting to note that over one hundred years ago the British Drill Manual had been translated into French and in 1862 had to be translated back into English.

Historically speaking the Brown Bess Muskets were incorrect. British Garrison soldiers of 1856 used a muzzle loading Flintlock Musket dating back to 1738. However, by removing the flash pan and adding a sling the muskets were made to look much like Snider rifles.

On Saturday the 1st of September the Contingent moved to Seattle and settled in to their quarters at Pier 91, a Naval Supply Depot near the heart of Seattle. The next day was free and nearly everyone made a first visit to the World Fair and were admitted free of charge as participants.

During the next two days the Contingent practiced with the Second Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery who were also part of the British Period Sentry Mount. It was during this time when all concerned found that timing and positioning were all important in “Show Biz”, as they were continually checked on this by the producer until both items were perfect.

Wednesday afternoon full rehearsals commenced at the Pier 91 sports field. No doubt the sound of seven bands massed together caused quite a stir during the first rehearsal, however the Second Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery undoubtedly caused the greatest commotion when they fired a blank from their ancient 12 pounder. Concern was evident amongst the 25 or more workmen perched high up on the Magnolia Bridge at which the gun seemed to be aimed, and it is understood it was the cause for some consternation to the patients in the dental clinic located very close by.

Rehearsals progressed extremely well and on Sunday, the 9th of September, all personnel were transported to the fair grounds for the dress rehearsal. Bad luck prevailed that night and only the first 20 minutes of the Tattoo had been performed when the rains came and the rehearsal had to be cancelled. The next day the stadium was a sea of mud and the night’s performance had to be cancelled, but the World’s Fair executive had seen enough of the Tattoo to realize its potential and by Tuesday afternoon the stadium had been paved so that the tattoo could go rain or shine. Although the paving job cost fifteen thousand dollars it was paid for on opening night as the attendance at the Fair jumped by over 30 thousand people.

Tuesday was opening night for the Canadian Tattoo and was watched by well over 15 thousand enthusiastic spectators. Wednesday night, in the midst of a heavy rainstorm, as many or more jammed the stadium.

The Tattoo was well on its way to being the smash hit of the World fair and more seating was added to the stadium as capacity crowds attended each night and thousands were turned away. Th Tattoo was extended until the evening of Sunday the 16th of September with a matinee being performed that afternoon for some 500 underprivileged children.

No doubt the most thrilling part of the Tattoo for the participants was the lengthy standing ovation they received each night just prior to the Grand Finale when the entire Contingent formed up in the stadium, full lights were turned on and the voice of the Narrator, Captain RD Bell, First Patricia’s, boomed out, announcing: “Ladies and Gentlemen, The Canadian Contingent.” Applause such as this received from nearly 20 thousand people each night certainly was a heart-warming experience for all concerned.

Following the final performance of Sunday evening the President of the World Fair, Mr. Joseph E. Gandy, spoke to the entire Canadian Contingent and thanked them for their participation in the Fair. He said that the Canadian Tattoo was without a doubt the greatest spectacle presented at the fair since opening day. He stated that in six days they estimated that the tattoo had thrilled upwards of 150 thousand people. Following his address each member of the Canadian Contingent was presented with a set of cuff links and booklet commemorating “Century 21.”

During the duration of their stay at the World Fair, the entire Contingent received nothing but the best of hospitality and kindness from the people of Seattle. First Patricia’s were honoured to have been selected to take part in the “Canadian Tattoo” at “Century 21.”

4 photos.


1963

Western Command
March 7, 8 & 9

The Western Command Boxing Championships were held at Work Point Barracks, Esquimalt, B.C. hosted by 1PPCLI.

1PPCLI
October 5th, 1963

FIRST BATTALION PRINCESS PATRICIA’S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY

THE CEREMONY OF
TROOPING THE COLOUR and FAREWELL
TO THE
CITY OF VICTORIA
MUNICIPALITY OF ESQUIMALT
and the
PACIFIC COMMAND, ROYAL CANADIAN NAVY
on the occasion of the departure
FIRST BATTALION PRINCESS PATRICIA’S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY
To GERMANY

Reviewing Officer
MAJOR-GENERAL GR PEARKES
VC CB DSO MC CD
LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

WORK POINT BARRACKS, ESQUIMALT, B.C.
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5TH, 1963







Farewell to Esquimalt - 1963

The Patrician
October 6, 1963

The schedule for the day was a rigorous one. First on the program was the Farewell to Esquimalt. The guards formed up on the parade square and marched to the Municipal Hall where Reeve AC Wurtele presented a plaque to the battalion which gives it the right to parade through the municipality with bayonets fixed, drums beating and colors flying. This was reciprocated by a presentation of a framed picture of the colours. The parade then carried on to HMCS Naden, where farewell was said to our Navy comrades. An exchange of framed pictures of both colours took place and then led by the Navy, both contingents marched back to Work Point Barracks for a combined Army Navy Drumhead service.

Later in the afternoon, an engraved stone was unveiled at Beacon Hill Park to commemorate the presentation of the First Battalion’s Colours by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II at that location on July 17, 1959.

The final ceremony of the day started in the early evening. The guards formed up at Bay Street Armouries and marched to the Victoria City Hall. There, a short ceremony took place and the Commanding Officer gave a farewell address to the Mayor and Council. Mayor RB Wilson presented Lt. Col. Brown with a plaque of the city’s coat of arms and a framed certificate bequeathing the title of Honorary Citizen of Victoria on the Commanding Officer and also giving the battalion the right to hold parades through the city’s streets at any time. The Commanding Officer then presented the Mayor with a framed photograph of the colours.

The parade then carried on to Beacon Hill Park, where the band from HMCS Naden, the Regimental Band plus the Corps of Drums from both battalions performed a flawless and most impressive ceremony. The thousands of spectators were noticeably moved as the flags were slowly lowered on the main mast on the Royal Parade Ground. It was a most fitting ending to a busy and memorable week end.

On the Sunday, following the parade through Victoria and Beating Retreat ceremony at Beacon Hill Park, the officers hosted a reception for three hundred guests at the Mess, a fitting finale to our tour in Victoria.

During October and November the number of Patricia officers at Work Point decreased as drafts departed for Germany and Fort MacLeod. By the end of November the battalion was again reunited.

The engraved stone referred to reads:

VP

ON THIS SITE

HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZBETH II
PRESENTED HER COLOUR AND THE REGIMENTAL COLOUR
TO THE FIRST BATTALION
PRINCESS PATRICIA’S CANADIAN LIGHT INFANTRY
ON THE 17TH OF JULY 1959
THIS MEMORIAL WAS UNVEILED
ON THE 6TH OF OCTOBER 1963
BY
MAJOR GENERAL CB WARE DSO CD
COLONEL OF THE REGIMENT


continued in Part 8 ...